7 Anterior Aspect of the Neck: Deep Dissection



10.1055/b-0037-146632

7 Anterior Aspect of the Neck: Deep Dissection


Maria Peris-Celda

Fig. 7.1. Anterior and lateral cervical regions, anterolateral view, left side. The sternocleidomastoid and trapezius muscles have been removed.
Fig. 7.2. Detailed view of the inferior part of the posterior cervical triangle, anterior view, left side.
Fig. 7.3. Lateral cervical and subclavian regions, anterior view, left side. The middle third of the clavicle has been removed to expose the subclavian vein.
Fig. 7.4. Deep dissection of the neck, anterior view. Both sternocleidomastoid muscles, clavicles, and trapezius muscles have been removed. The thyrocervical trunk (*), Truncus thyrocervicalis, is incomplete in this case, and the inferior thyroid artery (not visualized in this figure) arises directly from the subclavian artery.
Fig. 7.5. Deep dissection of the neck, anterolateral view, left side. The left omohyoid and sternothyroid muscles have been retracted medially. The medial and middle thirds of the left clavicle have been removed.
Fig. 7.6. Deep dissection of the neck, anterolateral view, left side. The omohyoid and sternothyroid muscles have been retracted medially, and the internal jugular vein has been retracted laterally to expose the phrenic nerve.
Fig. 7.7. Deep dissection of the neck, anterolateral view, left side. The internal jugular vein has been retracted anteriorly to expose the vagus and phrenic nerves and the brachial plexus.
Fig. 7.8. Deep dissection of the neck, anterolateral view, right side. The sternocleidomastoid muscle has been removed, and a lower segment of the internal jugular vein and the common carotid artery have been removed to expose the vagus and phrenic nerves.
Fig. 7.9. Deep dissection of the neck, lateral view, right side. The sternocleidomastoid muscle has been removed, and a segment of the internal jugular vein and the common carotid artery has been removed.
Fig. 7.10. Deep dissection of the neck, superior anterior view, right side. The sternocleidomastoid muscle has been removed, and a segment of the internal jugular vein and carotid artery has been removed to expose the relationships of these vessels with the brachial plexus, vagus, and phrenic nerves.
Fig. 7.11. Deep dissection of the neck, anterolateral view, right side. The sternocleidomastoid muscle and a segment of the internal jugular vein, the common carotid artery, and the clavicle have been removed to expose the brachial plexus.
Fig. 7.12. Anterior superior view after removing the medial and middle thirds of the right clavicle. The subclavian vein has been exposed. The pectoralis major muscle has been retracted inferiorly.
Fig. 7.13. Deep dissection of the neck, anterolateral view, right side. The clavicle and the subclavian vein have been removed to expose the subclavian artery and brachial plexus. The vagus nerve has been retracted medially to expose the inferior thyroid artery. The right thyrocervical trunk (*) Truncus thyrocervicalis, has been exposed. This inferior thyroid artery arises directly from the subclavian artery.
Fig. 7.14. Deep cervical and subclavian regions, anterolateral view, right side. The brachial plexus has been exposed and elevated.
Fig. 7.15. Head and neck dissection, anterior view, right side. The right half of the maxilla, mandible, tongue, and oropharynx have been removed to show the prevertebral space, infratemporal fossa, and parapharyngeal space. The infrahyoid muscles and clavicle have been removed on both sides. A segment of the right common carotid artery and the internal jugular vein have been removed.
Fig. 7.16. Enlarged view of the dissection in Fig. 7.15.
Fig. 7.17. Deep dissection of the neck, anterior view, right side. A segment of the common carotid artery and the internal jugular vein have been removed to expose the vagus and phrenic nerves.
Fig. 7.18. Deep dissection of the head and neck, anterolateral view, right side. The internal jugular vein and venous plexus have been removed. The pharynx and trachea have been retracted medially to expose the laryngeal nerves. The vagus nerve and the inferior thyroid artery have been retracted medially to expose the vertebral artery.
Fig. 7.19. Deep dissection of the head and neck, anterolateral view, right side. The external carotid artery has been retracted anteriorly. The carotid sinus and body have been exposed.
Fig. 7.20. Deep dissection of the head and neck, anterior view. The right half of the pharynx and larynx has been removed to expose the prevertebral plane.
Fig. 7.21. Enlarged anterior view of the right infratemporal fossa and the parapharyngeal and prevertebral spaces. The external carotid artery has been retracted laterally to expose its branches.
Fig. 7.22. Lower cervical and upper thoracic region, anterior view, right side. The ansa subclavia and recurrent laryngeal nerve have been exposed.
Fig. 7.23. Lower cervical and upper thoracic region, anterior view, right side. The vagus nerve has been retracted medially to expose the vertebral artery and cervicothoracic ganglion.
Fig. 7.24. Parapharyngeal and prevertebral space, anterolateral view, right side. Enlarged view of the right common carotid artery bifurcation and innervation of the carotid sinus and body. The external carotid artery has been resected.
Fig. 7.25. Deep dissection of head and neck, anterolateral view, right side. The anterior scalene and longus colli muscles, trachea, and esophagus have been removed on the right side. The sympathetic trunk and vagus nerve have been retracted laterally. The cervical vertebrae and vertebral artery are exposed.
Fig. 7.26. Deep dissection of head and neck, anterior view.
Fig. 7.27. Lower cervical and upper thoracic region, anterior superior view. The common carotid artery has been removed on the right side. The trachea and esophagus have been divided.
Fig. 7.28. Deep dissection of the neck, anterior view. The cervical vertebrae are exposed.
Fig. 7.29. Enlarged view of the cervicothoracic junction, anterior superior view. The internal jugular veins and subclavian veins have been removed bilaterally.
Fig. 7.30. Deep dissection of the neck, anterolateral view, left side. The sympathetic trunk and vagus nerve have been retracted medially to expose the vertebral artery entering the foramen transversarium (*, thyrocervical trunk).
Fig. 7.31. Enlarged view of the left internal carotid artery and the internal jugular vein entering the skull base.

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May 23, 2020 | Posted by in OPHTHALMOLOGY | Comments Off on 7 Anterior Aspect of the Neck: Deep Dissection
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