4 Face: Superficial Dissection



10.1055/b-0037-146629

4 Face: Superficial Dissection


Maria Peris-Celda

Fig. 4.1. Facial dissection, right anterolateral view, superficial plane. The skin and subcutaneous tissue have been removed.
Fig. 4.2. Facial dissection, right lateral view, superficial plane. The temporal fascia layers have been exposed.
Fig. 4.3. Detailed view of the superior part of the right facial region, lateral view. Note the relationships between the temporal branches of the facial nerve and the layers of the temporal fascia.
Fig. 4.4. Detailed view of the inferior part of the right facial region, lateral view.
Fig. 4.5. Face and neck dissection, lateral view, right side. The sternocleidomastoid muscle has been retracted laterally to expose the common carotid artery.
Fig. 4.6. Detailed view of the inferior part of the face, lateral view, right side. The superficial lobe of the parotid gland has been retracted laterally to expose the facial nerve and the parotid duct.
Fig. 4.7. Deep facial dissection, lateral view, right side. The parotid gland, masseter muscle, majority of the facial muscles, and the zygomatic arch have been removed.
Fig. 4.8. Overview of the superficial facial region and anterolateral cervical region, left side. The platysma and sternocleidomastoid muscles have been partially removed.
Fig. 4.9. Superficial plane of the left facial region.
Fig. 4.10. Lateral view of the superficial plane of the left facial and cranial regions.
Fig. 4.11. Musculature of the face, anterolateral view, left side. The zygomatic muscles, part of the orbicularis oculi, orbicularis oris muscles, and buccal fat pad have been removed to expose the deep muscular plane.
Fig. 4.12. Enlarged view of the dissection in Fig. 4.11, anterolateral view, left facial region.
Fig. 4.13. Detailed view of the left facial and superior cervical regions, anterolateral view.
Fig. 4.14. Lateral view of the left facial and cervical regions. The parotid gland has been removed to expose the facial nerve. The sternocleidomastoid, occipitofrontalis muscles, and epicranial aponeurosis have been partially removed.
Fig. 4.15. Left facial region after removal of the parotid gland, lateral view.
Fig. 4.16. Head and neck dissection, lateral view, left side. The parotid gland has been removed. Part of the sternocleidomastoid, occipito frontalis muscles, and epicranial aponeurosis have been removed. Part of the frontal bone and frontal dura mater have been removed to expose the frontal lobe. Part of the parietal bone has been removed to expose the dura mater.
Fig. 4.17. Anterolateral view of the right frontotemporal region. The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and part of the epicranial aponeurosis have been removed to expose the temporal fascia. Note that the temporal fascia divides anteriorly into a superficial and deep layer. The temporal branches of the facial nerve cross the outer surface of the superficial layer of the temporal fascia to reach the frontal belly of the occipitofrontalis muscle.
Fig. 4.18. Anterolateral view of the right frontotemporal region. Further dissection exposes the pericranium deep to the epicranial aponeurosis.
Fig. 4.19. Lateral view of the right frontotemporal region. The frontal pericranium and superficial layer of temporal fascia have been folded forward. The temporal fascia and temporal aponeurosis overlying the temporalis muscle have been opened to expose the muscle.

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May 23, 2020 | Posted by in OPHTHALMOLOGY | Comments Off on 4 Face: Superficial Dissection
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