6 Anterior Aspect of the Neck: Superficial Dissection



10.1055/b-0037-146631

6 Anterior Aspect of the Neck: Superficial Dissection


Maria Peris-Celda

Fig. 6.1. Anterior and lateral cervical regions, lateral view, left side. The skin and subcutaneous tissue have been removed to expose the cervical fascia.
Fig. 6.2. Anterior and lateral cervical regions, lateral view, left side. The cervical fascia has been partially removed to expose the platysma muscle.
Fig. 6.3. Anterior cervical region (anterior cervical triangle), left side. The platysma muscle has been elevated and partially removed to expose the submental, submandibular, and carotid triangles. The boundaries of the anterior cervical triangle are the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle posteriorly, the inferior border of the mandible superiorly, and the midline. The anterior cervical triangle is subdivided into submental, submandibular or digastric, muscular, and carotid triangles. The submental triangle lies between the hyoid bone inferiorly and the paired anterior bellies of the digastric muscles. The submandibular triangle lies between the inferior border of the mandible and the anterior and posterior bellies of the digastric muscle. The carotid triangle is bounded by the posterior belly of the digastric superiorly, the superior belly of the omohyoid inferiorly, and the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid posteriorly. The muscular triangle is bounded by the superior belly of the omohyoid superiorly, the anterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle posteriorly, and the midline.
Fig. 6.4. Detailed view of the submandibular and carotid triangles, lateral view, left side. The posterior belly of the digastric muscle separates both triangles.
Fig. 6.5. Anterior cervical region, anterolateral view, left side. The submandibular gland has been retracted laterally to expose the hypoglossal nerve.
Fig. 6.6. Overview of the anterior and lateral cervical regions, left side. The platysma muscle has been resected.
Fig. 6.7. Lateral cervical region (posterior cervical triangle), left side. The posterior cervical triangle is located between the posterior border of the sternocleidomastoid muscle anteriorly, the anterior border of the trapezius muscle posteriorly, and the clavicle inferiorly.
Fig. 6.8. Lateral cervical region and cervical plexus, lateral view, left side.
Fig. 6.9. Lateral cervical region, left side. Anterior view of the posterior cervical triangle and cervical plexus.
Fig. 6.10. Anterior cervical and sternocleidomastoid regions, left side. The sternocleidomastoid region has been exposed by reflecting the sternocleidomastoid muscle posteriorly.
Fig. 6.11. Lateral cervical region, left side. Superior view of the posterior cervical triangle.
Fig. 6.12. Lateral cervical region. Detailed anterolateral view of the posterior cervical triangle, left side. The trapezius muscle has been retracted posteriorly.
Fig. 6.13. Lateral and posterior cervical regions, left side. The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and cervical fascia have been removed. The trapezius muscle is localized in the posterior cervical region, or nuchal region.
Fig. 6.14. Posterior cervical region bilaterally, posterior view.
Fig. 6.15. Lateral and posterior cervical regions, posterolateral view, left side. The trapezius muscle has been partially removed.
Fig. 6.16. Lateral and posterior cervical regions, posterolateral view, left side. The sternocleidomastoid muscle has been removed.
Fig. 6.17. Detailed view of the lateral and posterior cervical regions and occipital area, posterolateral view, left side. The sternocleidomastoid muscle has been removed. The occipital artery and greater and lesser occipital nerves have been exposed.

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May 23, 2020 | Posted by in OPHTHALMOLOGY | Comments Off on 6 Anterior Aspect of the Neck: Superficial Dissection
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