Oral Cavity and Oropharynx

11 Oral Cavity and Oropharynx


Scott McCusker



Summary


This chapter presents a comprehensive series of photographic views of the oral cavity and oropharynx. The exact settings and all details required to create these images are discussed in depth, as are the special techniques required for working within the anatomic constraints of the region. Use of appropriate images from these series will allow accurate and thorough documentation of the oral cavity and oropharynx for a broad range of applications in general otolaryngology, head and neck oncology, and facial plastic surgery.


Keywords


anatomy, camera angle, composition, focus, image series, landmarks, oral cavity, orientation, oropharynx


Introduction


The photographs that follow represent standardized views of the oral cavity and oropharynx for use in a wide variety of clinical situations. Except as noted below, all were taken with the same camera, lens, and settings: Nikon D800 camera body, Micro-Nikkor 105 mm f/2.8 lens, Sigma EM-140 DG Ring Flash, f/32, 1/125, and ISO 100. A rigid endoscope can also be used for similar results.


11.1
Image Series


11.1.1 Anterior Dentition, Lips Retracted, Frontal


The borders of the frame are the lips, which are retracted bilaterally using a plastic “Smiley” retractor (Fig 11.1). The patient faces straight ahead with the teeth closed gently and without shifting the mandible from a neutral position. Focus on the central incisors.


11.1.2 Anterior and Lateral Dentition, Lips Retracted, Left and Right Oblique


This is the same as “Anterior Dentition, Lips Retracted, Frontal,” but with the patient turned 45 degrees left and right, respectively. Focus on the nearest tooth. By shifting the retractor toward the side closest to the camera, more of the lateral dentition can be visualized.


11.1.3 Anterior and Lateral Dentition, Lips Retracted, Left and Right Profile


This is the same as “Anterior Dentition, Lips Retracted, Frontal,” but with the patient turned 90 degrees left and right, respectively. Focus on the nearest tooth. The retractor should only be used on the side closest to the camera so that more of the lateral dentition can be visualized.


11.1.4 Lower Face, Maximum Mouth Opening, Frontal, Left and Right Oblique, Left and Right Profile


This series is the same as “Lower Face, Frontal, Left and Right Oblique, Left and Right Profile” from Chapter 10, with the exception that the mouth is opened maximally. The 4-light balanced setup is used, and the settings are f/11, 1/125, and ISO 100.


Dec 2, 2017 | Posted by in HEAD AND NECK SURGERY | Comments Off on Oral Cavity and Oropharynx
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